Federal Child Welfare Compensation
We are here to support you

Squamish Nation welcomes Canada’s commitment to set aside $40 billion for First Nations child welfare and we are cautiously optimistic that long-term reform of the child welfare system will end the discrimination our families have faced.

No amount of money will ever reverse the harms done to our Squamish Nation children, though this settlement will act as an acknowledgement of the historical injustices by the government that has failed Indigenous children. 

Questions?

Contact Ayás Mén̓men Director, Kelley McReynolds
Phone: 604-985-4111 
Email: amm_reception@squamish.net 

The federal government recently signed an agreement which includes compensation to First Nations children who have been harmed by Canada’s discriminatory child welfare system. This compensation agreement covers children who were either removed from their homes or who did not receive adequate services between 1991 and 2007. The final details of how they will receive compensation have not been set, but the process is expected to be complete by the end of March 2022.

This agreement affects many in our Squamish Nation community. Ayás Mén̓men (Child & Family Services) is here to support you through this process.  

Though the details of the agreement and compensation are not yet finalized, be assured that we will hold the government to this commitment, and we will not settle for anything less than our children deserve.  

We as a Nation will be as involved as possible to ensure our families and children receive the highest benefits that they are entitled to and we will update the community as more details are finalized. 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Ayás Mén̓men Director, Kelley McReynolds at 604-985-4111 or amm_reception@squamish.net.

More Information

First Nations have been fighting for over 30 years to redress the monumental wrongs to all Indigenous children, including our Squamish Nation children.

This legal battle began on February 23, 2007, when the First Nations Child & Family Caring Society and the Assembly of First Nations filed a human rights complaint alleging that Canada’s chronic failure to equitably fund First Nations child welfare and its approach to Jordan’s Principle were discriminatory.

This settlement is an historic moment of recognition of past wrongs and illustrates a commitment to redress. No amount of money will ever reverse the harms done to our Squamish Nation children, though this settlement will act as an acknowledgement of the historical injustices by the government that has failed Indigenous children. 

Once the final deal is negotiated, the settlement agreements and distribution plan must be approved by the court and the Human Rights Tribunal before it is implemented.

The compensation agreement covers children either removed from their homes or who did not receive adequate services between 1991 and 2007. The final details of how they will receive compensation have not been set, but the process is expected to be complete by the end of March.

We thank Cindy Blackstock, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and the Assembly of First Nations for their years of tireless advocacy on behalf of our children and families.

The precise number is not yet known. However as part of this process, independent third-party experts estimated that over 200,000 First Nations children, youth and caregivers were impacted by Canada’s discrimination in the First Nations Child and Family Services Program and Jordan’s Principle and would therefore be eligible for compensation.

In addition to compensation, all First Nations children and families will benefit from a reformed family and child services system.

Details on eligibility and the application process are still being determined and will be shared once a final settlement agreement is reached. We will provide updates on this page as well as other Squamish Nation channels as soon as information is available.

The total settlement package is valued at $40 billion. This includes a total of $20 billion that will be made available to compensate First Nations children and families impacted by the federal government’s discriminatory funding practices and $19.807 billion for fundamental reform to the FNCFS Program and Jordan’s Principle.

The next step is to negotiate the Final Settlement Agreement by Spring 2022. From there the eligibility and compensation amounts will be determined, which will then be approved by the courts. A lot of work needs to be conducted before the amounts for individual compensation are released, including reviewing data on children in care and Jordan’s Principle since 1991.

The Squamish Nation and Ayás Mén̓men will remain involved and informed so that our children and families are able to access what they’re entitled to. We will also be reviewing our records to make sure all of our children are accounted for.