Squamish Nation challenges province’s Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion environmental approval

NEWS RELEASE

 ‘A spill could be catastrophic for our people’

Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation) challenges province’s Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion environmental approval

VANCOUVER (Nov. 2, 2017) — Skwxwú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation) is challenging the B.C. government’s approval of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in the B.C. Supreme Court in a judicial review starting on Monday.

“The provincial government failed in its duty to adequately consult Squamish Nation on a project that threatens our land rights and could result in an environmental disaster,” said Chief Ian Campbell, an elected councillor and spokesperson for Squamish Nation. “Our concerns were not addressed.”

The B.C. government had participated in the National Energy Board process in 2016 and questioned the lack of information about diluted bitumen should a marine spill occur, then in January quickly approved the project’s environmental assessment certificate before announcing a deal worth up to $1 billion ($25 million to $50 million annually) over 20 years.

The Trans Mountain expansion would triple the capacity of oil in the pipeline and is expected to increase the number of tankers from five to 35 each month.

The tankers pass by three Squamish Nation communities on the Burrard Inlet along with historic villages.

“A marine spill could be catastrophic for the Squamish people. The government granted the certificate without enough information about how the bitumen could be cleaned up when a spill occurs in the Burrard Inlet or in the Salish Sea,” Chief Campbell said.

In October, Squamish Nation also participated with other First Nations in a judicial review against the federal approval of the pipeline expansion. The NDP B.C. government acted as an intervener in the federal case but has indicated it will go ahead next week with defending the former Liberal B.C. government’s environmental assessment certificate approval.

“Were they just posturing when they joined First Nations in the fight against Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion last month?” Chief Campbell asked.

The provincial judicial review, expected to last one week, will begin at the B.C. Supreme Court at 800 Smithe St. in Vancouver on Monday, Nov. 6 at 10 a.m.

Full News Release (PDF)

B.C. Supreme Court sides with Squamish Nation in eviction battle

An abandoned trailer in Riverside Trailer Park after all tenants were evicted Sept. 30, 2017.

A former tenant of a Squamish Nation trailer park has been ordered to pay more than $10,000 in back rent and damages after a year-long battle over land rights.

The nation sued Wendy Linton for rent owed after she was evicted from Riverside Trailer Park in Squamish on Sept. 30, 2017. A band chief was operating the trailer park, which was expanded onto disputed land on the Seaichem 16 Reserve.

Linton refused to sign an agreement issued last September that would have given her one year rent-free if she left the trailer park without a fight.

Read More at the link: https://thethunderbird.ca/2017/10/25/supreme-court-sides-with-squamish-nation-in-eviction-battle/

Heather Street Lands; Chief Ian Campbell suggests Reconciliation action

Chief Ian Campbell interviewed by CBC Radio about the Heather Street Lands

http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1082875971769

Chief Ian Campbell suggests tearing down Vancouver’s historic RCMP barracks in spirit of reconciliation

The 100-year-old Fairmont Academy stands as a symbol of oppression and discrimination:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/squamish-chief-suggests-tearing-down-vancouver-s-historic-rcmp-barracks-in-spirit-of-reconciliation-1.4375207

Immediate Snag and Treble Hook fishing closure on Cheakamus Frog Pond

Motion #3:  October 20, 2017

Subject:  Immediate Snag and Treble Hook fishing closure on Cheakamus Frog Pond

WHEREAS: Squamish Nation Chiefs and Council support conservation of fish stock and management of traditional fishing practices.

WHEREAS: Council is aware of some individuals over-fishing and carrying out other destructive fishing practices in certain traditional fishing areas.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT,  Squamish Nation Chiefs and Council support the immediate closure of snag and treble hook fishing on the Cheakamus Frog Pond on I.R. 11 as a means to protect and conserve the Cheakamus Salmon fishery.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT, the closure will be effective Monday to Friday and 24 hours a day and will be open dawn to dusk on Saturdays and Sundays

FINALLY BE IT RESOLVED THAT, Squamish Nation sport fishermen are not included in this closure and can continue to fish 7 days a week.

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